Month: October 2016

Why You Should Have Book Tag

So, I’ve seen this book tag going around booktube lately and I thought it would be fun to try it out, being it my first book tag and all.

I’m basically going to say my opinion about a bunch of questions that have the phrase ‘totally should have” in them. Sounds like fun, right?

Let’s do it (!).

*A book that totally should have gotten a sequel*

I’m going with Maybe Someday by Colleen Hoover on this one.

I just didn’t want this book to end. And when it did, I just wanted more. This book was AMAZING. I loved every single word of it, and all I want is more Sydney and Ridge! They are so perfect *sighing dreamily*.

I would have LOVED to get another book with those characters!

All this talk about Maybe Someday makes me want to re-read it for the 6th time.

If you haven’t read this book yet – what have you been doing with your life? READ IT.

*A book series that totally should have had a spin off*

I thought of quite a few options. I mean, who doesn’t want their favourite series to have a spin-off? But it also needs to be fitting. Not every series, as much as you want it to, can have a spin-off.

In any case, I’m going with Harry Potter on this one. It would have been so good to have a spin-off series in the Harry Potter world. Can you imagine a spin-off of all the children of the characters from Harry Potter? Or maybe even a spin-off of Harry’s father, his mother and their friends… how they got to know each other and all of their adventures in their years at Hogwarts.

Oh yes, I totally would’ve wanted to read this.

*An author that totally should have written more books*

Suzanne Collins, Kristine Cashore and J.K Rowling.

All these authors wrote some very good books. The reason I can’t call them favourite authors of mine is because they’ve completely stopped writing more books.

An author grows with each book, gains experience and skills. I believe those authors could have been amazing if they just kept writing more.

Other than having a writer’s block, I honestly don’t get why an author would stop writing. It’s a very sad thing. These authors (and more, like: Stephenie Meyer) totally should have written more books.

*A character that totally should have ended up with somebody else*

99% of the time I ship the ship that will happen. It’s too hard for me to read a book if my ship is destroyed. It’s not to say I haven’t come across books where my ship was doomed.

*If you haven’t read the first 3 books of The Naturals series by Jennifer Lynn Barnes, skip to the next question. I’m going to say exactly who should have ended up with someone else and who did she actually end up with, so… consider yourselves warned*

Cassie should have totally ended up with someone else entirely.

Instead… she ended up with Dean.

*sigh*

Not my ship at all. I was on an entirely different ship called Cassie & Michael.

Cassie and Michael had chemistry and they kept bumping into each other. From the beginning, you just knew there was something special between them.

With Dean? I felt none of that. They hardly talked, hardly had any real conversation or any kind of chemistry and yet somehow they ended up together.

I honestly don’t understand how or why.

Granted, there is at least one more book in the series so it’s not finished quite yet, but… the chances she’ll change her mind for some reason look slim to none right now.

*Another sigh*

But who knows, maybe I’ll get the surprise of my life in the next book and my ship will sail again.

*A book that totally should have ended differently*

Carry on by Rainbow Rowell.

As I wrote in my review of Carry on: This. Is. Not. An. Ending.

The first 90% of the book? Pure amaziness.

The last 10% of the book? All hell breaks loose. Fast. Me? *blinking slowly*, putting the book aside, wondering what in the world just happened.

Seriously? Is this how it ends?

Yeah… no.

*A book that totally should have had a TV show*

Definitely The Lunar Chronicles!

I got this idea the lunar chronicles would make a fantastic TV show while reading the third book. Something about this wold, those characters, all the complexity and awesomeness of it… I could just imagine it as a TV show. And that says a lot considering I’m not in the habit of wanting to turn books I love into movies\TV shows. But with the lunar chronicles… I felt like, in the right hands, it could be such an amazing show.

Can you imagine the possibilities? Just thinking about it makes me all giddy inside.

There is always a risk to adapting a book to the big screen (Just look at the TV show shadowhunters. nope, sorry, I can’t deal with this show. I love the mortal instruments too much), but if done right, wouldn’t it be just amazing?

*A book that totally should have been a movie*

I’m not too keen on book-to-movie adaptations. TV shows? They are usually much more capable of capturing the essence of the book (in those rare occasions) + they are longer and can actually adapt the *whole* book\series and not just parts of it (though they usually don’t do it).

I find that I enjoy the movies of books I didn’t like. Books I love, though… their movies either make me want to kill someone (probably the one who made the movie) or go into denial mode and pretend this movie doesn’t exist. Usually I start with option one and ends up with option two.

So… what book should I nominate for a movie adaptation? I actually have two in mind: Wings by Aprilynn Pike and Sweet Evil by Wendy Higgins. They can turn to be great movies. They both have a very interesting fantasy element that has lots of potential (which I felt hasn’t fully grown in the books).

*A book that totally should have had one POV*

Usually, I don’t have a problem with multiple POVs. If it’s more than 2 POVs than it might get annoying, but I don’t come across many books with more than 2 POVs. The only one that comes to mind is the Heroes Of Olympus series, and while it’s true I didn’t particularly like hearing from a few characters POVs, it didn’t bother me that much.

The Rose & The dagger (by Renee Ahdieh) though… honestly? I did not see the point of condemning us to Irsa POV and a few other random POVs. It was annoying, boring and all I thought while reading those POVs was: “when will we get back to Shazi?” and: “What’s going on with Shazi right now?” and: “Please let this chapter be over so we can go back to the real story.”

Sorry, but you can’t just randomly shove POVs at the readers. Multiple POVs are great when there is a point to them. When there is no apparent point to them? Yeah, not so much.

*A book that totally should have had a cover change*

Richelle Mead has that habit of having ah… really strange book covers for her books. It happened with the vampire academy, with the bloodlines series, and the latest victim was the glittering court book cover. I mean, with the vampire academy and bloodlines I could at least understand there were humans on the covers that were supposed to be Rose and Sydney, but… well, ah… is the person on the glittering court cover even human? It looks *so weird*.

*A book that totally should have not had a cover change*

Hmm… I have to say, I don’t know. It’s usually the other way around: I can’t think of a book I’ve read that got a cover change for the worse. Maybe… Carry On? The previous cover was prettier, in my opinion.

*A book that totally should have stopped at book one*

Divergent.

Oh, believe me, I was a big fan of Divergent once upon a time. I loved books 1 and 2 very much. And then came along book 3 and… well. Let’s just say I would rather it ended with book 1.

“Writing is… being able to take something whole and fiercely alive that exists inside you in some unknowable combination of thought, feeling, physicality, and spirit, and to then store it like a genie is tense, tiny black symbols on a calm white page. If the wrong reader comes across the words, they will remain just words. But for the right readers, your vision blooms off the page and is absorbed into their minds like smoke, where it will re-form, while and alive, fully adapted to its new environment.”
— Mary Gaitskill

Why Historical Fictions Are the Best Books for Young Adults

The ‘best books for young adults’ are historical fiction and here are eleven benefits for you as a young adult, or your parents, to encourage you to read historical fiction.

Statistics show that the young human brain has a natural ability to absorb new information as part of its developmental growth.

As we age the speed at which we learn slows down. While you are young is a good time to encourage the development of the following qualities:

1) KNOWLEDGE – It will have obvious benefits for you as you learn to retain more knowledge and start life with a good grasp of dates and periods of the past.

2) IMAGINATION – As you sense reality in the past, your imagination will grow.

3) APPRECIATION – You will learn an appreciation of the past which will spill into the present

4) RESPECT – You will learn a new respect for the passage of time and will learn to respect the future

5) WISDOM – You will grow wiser as you witness the hypothetical thinking (or not) from the past. Learning from past mistakes will take on a greater meaning for you

6) ENGAGING – You will learn that history is engaging. Characters from the past weave an entertaining illustration around lifeless facts making history a lot more multi-dimensional than a long string of faceless facts designed to make exam time more difficult.

7) MEMORY – As a young adult you will become more proficient at creating instantaneous story ‘cues’ to remember facts later

8) DISCERNMENT – Historical fictions will also teach you to be discerning, when you see how the past can be altered with the flick of the writer’s pen or the command from a king for example

9) RESPECT – You will be taught appreciation for the aging process and respect for older people

10) ROLE MODELING – Helps you to shape your development. The characters from the past are excellent role models for young adults. Their variety of designs and temperaments offer a wide selection for young adults to model themselves after

11) ACCOUNTABILITY – Helps you decide what lifestyle might better yourself or not when you become an adult. Watching the outcome for others can help shape the younger adults accountability for their own actions – NOW!

Check out Amazon.com, Smashwords and any institution carrying historical fiction books and help yourself get a head start in life!

Casey Grace is an expert in the Riviera Maya, Mexico, and books for young adults she has written with her daughter include all aspects of living, working and playing in the ancient land of the Maya.

Her background in the television and film industry in Toronto bring the entertainment aspect to their books.

The Greatest Post Apocalyptic Books

Post-apocalypse is a classic theme of science fiction, where mankind is knocked back into oblivion after something really, really bad happens. Of course, after the dropping of atomic bombs, people for the first time realized that mankind possessed the power to bring about its own apocalypse. However, nuclear holocaust is not the only way catastrophe can strip the thin veneer of civilization of mankind. In the distant, mythical past, the Great Flood almost brought about apocalypse, leaving Noah and his family in a post-apocalyptic scenario. Many such possibilities as to how mankind would respond to overwhelming devastation have been presented to us in science fiction post-apocalyptic books, such as the ones listed below.

1. The Road

An arid world in the aftermath of an unknown severely destructive event is introduced in Cormac McCarthy’s The Road. The dreary landscape now has only a few remaining survivors who are looking for food and warmth. An unnamed father and son are followed in the book as they make their way across the destruction. People in this book’s post-apocalyptic world are turning into savage cannibals and the father is afraid of leaving his son alone because he is certain that he is dying. Nonetheless, the father and son plod on. According to The New York Times, McCarthy’s has always had high standards for despair and yet, the imagery in this book is far more brutal. The Road is probably one of the most gut-wrenching post-apocalyptic books.

2. Dream Caster

Memories of his slaughtered settlement haunt sixteen year old Weaver, who is seeking cover among the remains of a ruined Toronto in a hidden refuge. Amidst build a new life, Weaver discovers he possesses the strangle ability to cast dreams into reality. Weaver ignores it believing it is just an abnormality. He later discovers that his world was actually ruined by a mysterious man who possesses a similar ability of animating nightmares into reality. Chaos starts invading the peaceful life that Weave was hoping to begin. While racing against time, Weaver must learn to accept that he is a dream catcher and master the ability he possesses, before the mysterious man destroys his new home too. The original story idea and unique combination of genres is the best feature of Dream Caster.

3. The Stand

The Stand is perhaps the most popular book by Stephen King and it is also probably one of the most popular post-apocalyptic books too. The worst is imagined in the book, i.e. a superflu’ is unleashed into the world because of a computer error in a Defense Department lab as a result of which 99% of the population is wiped out. Thus, the path for a post-apocalyptic clash between good and evil is paved. While commenting on his own book, King exclaimed that he got the opportunity to scrub the entire human race and that he really enjoyed that.

4. The Drowned World

In his 1962 science-fiction novel, J.G. Ballard tells the story of Robert Kerans, a biologist whose team is sent to survey the cities of American and northern Europe. The regions have been turned into tropical lagoons with the absence of human life as a result of the melting of the polar ice caps and radiation. Kerans and his teammates, among the few survivors, marvel in this new post-apocalyptical state of the world. As written in TIME, the book is cool even though it is kind of too much. The book even has an interesting twist as well and spoiling it would not be fair.

5. The Passage

The Passage is a highly-anticipated book by author Justin Cronin and it hit shelves not so long ago. In fact, even before Cronin even completed the manuscript, he sold the film rights. All the fuss about this 766-page book is that it revolves around bloodthirsty creatures that are somewhat like vampires, but also somewhat like zombies, and these creatures are killing off Americans one by one. However, it is the engrossing sense and style of story that has been hailed by critics.

There is something intriguing about imagining the end of the world. Have you ever imagined the end of the world? These five post-apocalyptic books seem to imagine the end of the world quite uniquely. So which one do you think you will read?

Tips To Get The Point During Reading

Why is that important you might ask, well if your message is clear and to the point your recipient will know exactly what you are talking about. In business clear messages save time and misunderstandings and this is equally important in every-day life. The conversations do not need to be terse of formal just clear and to the point.

Once you have mastered the techniques you will have learned to focus your thinking, speaking and writing. Your conversations won’t wander aimlessly up a blind alley. You will become more logical and easier to listen to, the result a better success rate in your endeavour.

30 seconds is probably the amount of time a person can concentrate, so to catch their attention and get your message across aim to do it in 30 seconds. If you consider adverts on TV they are condensed into bites of around 30 seconds. Why, because it has been found the most successful amount of time for people to absorb the content.

“The little book How to Get your Point across in 30 seconds” by Milo O Frank gives you all the pointers necessary to improve your communication skills. It covers areas like knowing your single objective not complicating matters by having several agendas in one conversation. Talking to the right person, finding the best approach, having a hook to capture attention and using humour. How to develop your subject by painting a picture verbally and of course clearly asking for the result you require.

All through this little book the author has laid out a clear progression for improving your techniques and not being afraid to ask for what you want to achieve. Another book “Ask for the Moon and Get It!” Percy Ross also states in order to succeed, ask for what you want and keep asking.

So in business as in everything else the answer is to know what you want, be specific, clear and concise. This doesn’t mean you can’t be friendly, but be memorable by painting a picture, have a hook to capture attention and finish by asking clearly for your objective. All this should be confined to a 30 second sound bite. Develop this skill and you should find doors open for you and your progress being made.

 

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