Category: Book

How To Raise the Happiness Bar

Heightening Your Happiness is a new book by Karen Degen that builds on many positive thinking techniques that have come before it, but it stands out because Karen puts her own spin on how to achieve happiness and she offers practical techniques to make that happen. She teaches her readers, no matter what their situations, how to determine and get rid of the obstacles that are holding them back in life, even if they don’t realize what those obstacles are. Sharing examples from her personal life, from those nagging fears and the mind chatter we all have to a major tragedy she experienced, Karen takes readers through a series of practices that will have them finding new joy and meaning in life, and most of all, a renewed sense of happiness.

While I don’t have room to discuss all the points in this book that Karen makes, for me, her discussion on stress was the most helpful. Karen begins by explaining what stress is and how our bodies can’t differentiate between the stress of a being attacked by a lion or having to meet a deadline at work. It just knows stressed or relaxed. She then makes a point that hit home for me: “The main difference between happy people and not so happy people is that happy people do less and, therefore, have less stress. Happy people simplify their lives.” Karen then gives us multiple tips about how to do less and how to create time for ourselves. She asks us to look deep into our beliefs that we’ve been carrying around that make us try to do too much, such as “It’s up to me to look after my family.” She explores the roles we take on as children, perhaps as the eldest child who has to help mom, or the “good child” who behaves because a sibling is causing mom and dad emotional pain. While those roles may have served us in the past, now they are hurting us so we need to let go of them.

Many of us do too much because we don’t know how to say, “No.” We’ve all heard how we have to learn to say that magic word, but most of us don’t know how. Karen offers practical words and an effective technique we can use in difficult situations so we can quit agreeing to do what we don’t want to do. I found her examples helpful and I am slowly learning to adapt her “No” phrases as my own.

What Karen’s ideas largely boil down to is changing the rules we’ve imposed on ourselves and are trying to impose on others. Too often, we get upset when people don’t play by our rules when they may not even know what they are, plus they probably have their own rules guiding them. Karen explains: “I think of each person as having an unwritten rule book in his or her head. This rule book has all of our needs, wants, and expectations in any given situation or relationship. The relationship may be a romantic one, a parent/child relationship, a friendship, a business relationship, or in fact, any person you interact with. The other person has a rule book in his or her head too. The problem is we often don’t communicate our needs, wants, and expectations to the other person. ‘I shouldn’t have to tell him’ I often hear from my clients. ‘It should be obvious.’ We just assume that other people’s rule books are the same as ours, but very often, they aren’t.” Karen then goes on to explain how we can learn to set boundaries, which includes communicating our rules and perhaps negotiating them with others to come to a mutual understanding. I know from personal experience that setting boundaries is vital to a person’s happiness so I highly recommend her advice here.

I’ll admit I’ve read a lot of self-help books, but if nothing else, two very short sentences in this book had a profound impact on me. The first is my favorite line in the book: “feel the guilt and do it anyway.” I absolutely love that sentence because it gives me permission to do what I want to do. I’ve often tried to learn how not to feel guilty about things, but now I feel freed from even trying not to feel guilty.

The other powerful sentence I found relates to when Karen describes how she can let her fears get the worst of her until she’s convinced her husband who may just be late coming home is experiencing a terrible death or disaster. We all have unreasonable fears that we allow to transform themselves into the worst scenarios. We also know that fear is usually unreal. The way Karen handles this is not just to notice what her brain is doing, but flippantly to say, “I knew it was just my brain doing what brains do.” She goes on to compare this situation to the fable of Chicken Little shouting that the sky is falling because an acorn fell on her head. We wouldn’t listen to a dumb chicken so why listen to our brain when it’s acting dumb? From now on, I’ll just ignore my brain when it goes into crazy worry mode.

 

All About Public Speaking Books

Participants in my public speaking workshops have often asked me to recommend some great books that they can read to take their mastery of public speaking to the next level. Indeed, reading is a great way in which you can gain new ideas and novel perspectives on speech delivery.

Here are 5 books I highly recommend that you can read to improve your public speaking skills.

Book #1: Confessions of a Public Speaker by Scott Berkun

A book that divulges the secrets behind what great speakers and communicators do, and how you can emulate the success of these speakers through highly practical tips.

Book #2: Talk Like TED: The 9 Public-Speaking Secrets of the World’s Top Minds by Carmine Gallo

The ideas presented in this book are current and cutting-edge. If you want to learn how to sell yourself and your ideas on stage, this book is for you.

Book #3: Speak Like Churchill, Stand Like Lincoln: 21 Powerful Secrets of History’s Greatest Speakers by James C. Humes

Great leaders like Churchill and Lincoln are not only remembered for their heroic leadership, but also for their mesmerizing and captivating speeches. If you want to learn how to deliver inspirational speeches that captures the hearts and souls of your audience, pick up this book right away!

Book #4: Presentation Zen: Simple Ideas on Presentation Design and Delivery by Garr Reynolds

Garr Reynolds is going to change the way you deliver presentations using PowerPoint and Keynote. This book presents noteworthy ideas that transform the way you prepare, design and deliver your presentations.

Book #5: The Quick and Easy Way to Effective Speakingby Dale Carnegie

A classic book of public speaking by the guru of communication, Dale Carnegie. This book discloses the fundamentals of how you can influence minds and win hearts through effective speaking. Another book not to be missed!

Conclusion

While I strongly believe that the best way to learn how to deliver exceptional speeches is to do the real thing itself (yes! keep getting stage time to practice your speeches and hone your craft), reading books for new ideas and novel perspectives can put you on a highway to success and accomplishments in this arena. So go forth and pick up a book right away!

 

When You Need To Read A Book

There are a number of books that accumulatively have changed my life, together with life’s experiences. Sometimes a particular book will provide an answer or training in a specific area; sometimes it is an on-going growth sequence. There are times when a suitable book can be a great inspiration or comfort and help to drive you forward. Here you will find a brief description of books that have had an impact on me, are they books you have read or would they help you?

Years ago there were a few books that were instrumental in my sales success:

“The One Minute Sales Person” by Spencer Johnson and Larry Wilson, they also wrote “The One Minute Manager” Their message was – Give people what they want and you will get what you want.

Tom Hopkins, “How to Master the Art of Selling”, and “The Official Guide to Success” was also a favourite. At the age of 21 he made his first million in sales – I can’t say I achieved that but it is an informative book!

A book perhaps everyone could benefit from is “How to Get Your Point Across in 30 seconds or Less, by Milo Frank.

On a personal development level, “Awaken the Giant Within” by Anthony Robbins, teaches you how to take control of your life mentally emotionally physically and financially.

“Feel the Fear and Do It Anyway” by Susanne Jeffers, offers suggestions for overcoming fear and procrastination.

“Do It! A guide to Living Your Dreams” by John Rodgers and Peter McWilliams, takes you from where you are now to what you want to achieve in your life through 6 stages and in great detail.

If You need help in believing you can, read “The Power of Your Subconscious Mind” by Joseph Murphy. He also cured himself of a life threatening illness, a truly inspiring, confidence building book.

“Creative Visualization” by Ronald Shone will teach you how to visualise your goals to reach them faster, I have used visualisation for years in achieving goals, and recently discovered how well this book illustrates the use of visualisation, (once I got through the first few pages).

If you are looking for an inspirational story “Ask for the Moon and Get It” by Percy Ross; through his efforts he became a philanthropist and gave away money and gifts for the rest of his life. If you want to look up his further details of his life Google his name, he gave away all his money before he died, (not too long ago) plus hundreds of bicycles to needy children because as a boy he had longed for a bike.

There are inspiring classics that still carry a powerful message like Napoleon Hill’s “Think and Grow Rich” and “Keys to Success” and I’m sure I could name many more I have enjoyed and found helpful.

I will just mention a couple more “Thank God It’s Monday” by Charles Cameron and Suzanne Elusorr. A book with great messages if you find yourself in work you hate. It offers advice to make your job more tolerable whilst you find a job or career that suits you. Plus a book I have recently found helpful in building my current online business “99 Ways to Flood Your Website With Traffic” by Mick Macro.

So whatever your needs are at the moment there a millions of books out there that could help or stimulate you. Maybe you feel you are in a rut and need a new hobby or career, whatever your need I wish you well and hope I have shared some reading that will interest you.

 

How To Tearing Down A Ponzi Scheme

In Miles Away Worlds Apart, Alan Sakowitz does an excellent job in putting a face to the terrible and unbelievable financial exploits of Scott Rothstein, who was running a larger than life ponzi scheme in Florida.

Mr. Sakowitz give a very detailed account of his role in bringing down a well respected man in the community. As his story unfolds we follow him as he battles his own demons and decides to do the right thing and help the authorities bring this horrible man to justice.

The author shares how in by bringing this scheme to the public’s attention, he faced challenges and danger in his own personal life. But while dealing with all that was going on, he was reminded that there are still good people out there willing to help and stand beside someone who is doing the right thing.

This book reads like a work of fiction, and ranks among authors like John Grisham, in bringing a world of intrigue and deceit to life. It is all the more relevant now that we are in the financial crisis we are currently experiencing. I wouldn’t have thought that it was possible to continue in pulling these horrible ponzi schemes after what we have witnessed recently, but this book proves that there are still people out there living like kings by taking money from people who can hardly afford to lose it.

I think that anyone who is involved in the business of finance should be required to read this story of how one brave man had the strength and morals to fight this fight. I commend him and respect his commitment to do the right thing.

All About Economic Wisdom

With the economic uncertainties in the world today, should America return to the gold standard? This controversial topic is the driving theme behind author Edmund Contoski’s book The Impending Monetary Revolution, The Dollar and Gold. Edmund, who has 45 years of experience in international markets and has conducted investment seminars in precious metals and foreign currencies, argues that “American politicians have debauched the currency for agendas contrary to our Constitution and to get themselves elected.” Whether you believe America should go back to the gold standard or not, most people would agree with the author’s statement that “governments are on the verge of bankruptcy because there is no restraint-which a gold standard would provide-on their spending and manipulation of credit.” Edmund Contoski has, with his book, made a topic I would ordinarily find dull and dry-namely, economics-one which is fascinating and interesting.

What are some of the points the author brings up to support his argument that the United States and the world should base the stability of their currency on their gold reserves? What’s happened to Greece is one of the best examples that the media and economists use to illustrate the worst that can befall a country which spends beyond its means and borrows to make up the difference. The U.S. has not yet suffered the same types of dire problems, but that’s because of the dollar’s status as a world reserve currency. This means it can pay its debts by simply printing more of its own money. However, even the U.S. cannot keep printing its own money forever without eventually its currency becoming devalued-it’s actually happening even now, to a degree.

Contoski writes in his very perceptive persuasive book how the world’s economic crisis began, how money was developed and how countries have ‘perverted” it, what the “credit bubble” is, how and why the euro arose, what some of the threats are to the world’s banking system, and much, much more, including the rise of China and India as major economic powers.

What can be done, if anything, about the growing debt that we’re imposing on our children and grandchildren? What will the dollar be worth in five or ten years? Why has the economy stagnated, and why is unemployment as high as it is? How will euro problems affect the U.S.? Why does the national debt keep increasing? These are other questions the author seeks to answer in his well-researched book.

One great aspect about the book is that Contoski tries to explain economic concepts and how they affect the average person in layman’s terms as much as possible. For instance, when Contoski refers to something called “yuan-trading hubs,” and why many countries would like to become offshore yuan-trading hubs, though only Hong Kong is one now. China, according to the author, “has been rapidly diversifying its reserves and getting out of dollars.” To you and I, this means that China is trying to supplant the dollar with the yuan as the new world reserve currency. China “believes its turn has arrived for world leadership and the United States is in decline.” Sadly, there are many indications that point to the possibility that China might be correct in thinking this, though if the U.S. undertakes certain actions, they might still retain their status as the world’s economic powerhouse.

 

When Football Meet Finance

What do you think would happen if most people spent as much time planning their retirement and investments each year as they spend watching football? I suspect we would all have a lot more money, be better prepared for retirement, and maybe even be able to afford tickets to the Super Bowl every year.

Steve Roberts, with nearly twenty years of experience in the financial industry, knows that most people – including himself – would rather play or watch football than the stock market. After all, Steve himself was a three – sport letterman in high school, lettering in football, basketball, and baseball. He was a member of Ricks Junior College football team, and today he coaches youth football. But that doesn’t mean he doesn’t value financial planning and realize its importance. What it does mean is he had the brilliant idea to write a book about financial planning using football metaphors to make the topic not only more interesting but easier to understand for his many readers.

Steve breaks down his new book, “Football Financial Planning,” into three sections: Defense; Offense; and Coaches, Special Teams, and Systems. Then in each section, he discusses a valuable asset for your retirement or investing portfolio, and he compares that investment to a player in football. For example, he compares auto insurance to a defensive tackle and universal life insurance to an outside linebacker – these are players on your defense because you need them to protect your assets. Players on your offense include the center (your checking account), a right tackle (fixed annuity), and a tight end (bonds). Steve realizes that you may not always need every player on your team, but he walks you through the benefits as well as disadvantages of each player so you can decide whom you do want on your team and how you can use those players to create the best possible game plan for yourself.

I’ve read several financial planning books in the past, and they all are helpful in various ways. What makes Football Financial Planning stand out is not only that the football metaphor is fun, but that the way Steve breaks down the team makes each player or financial tool very easy to understand; because each player/investment product is a chapter by itself, the book is also accessible for referring back to and finding specific items later.

Steve makes the discussion easy to follow, and he really made me think about the different financial options out there and why certain ones would be great assets to have on my team while others would not. In the end, he reminds us that each of us is the team owner and even the quarterback of our own team, so we have to make the decisions on the plays.

As an added bonus, Steve provides play charts for avid football fans so they can see how their financial offense or defense adds up. At the end of each chapter, he also provides a short chart or worksheet for the reader to fill out, asking questions about things such as insurance deductibles, projected cash value, or income so people can write all their information down and keep it in one easy to find and remember location, as well as evaluate the different possibilities that exist for their financial game plan.

In the end, Steve’s entire system boils down to determining what system or philosophy works best for you because no one team will work for everyone. Steve highlights this point with the following story:

“To win a game (score big in your investments), it is very important to have a system (philosophy) that matches your quarterback’s abilities and talents. One university that has produced many great college quarterbacks is Brigham Young University (BYU); however, not all of BYU’s great quarterbacks have had success in the NFL. I once heard BYU’s former coach, Lavell Edwards, say that he believes Marc Wilson, one of his great quarterbacks, would have been more successful in the NFL if he had played in a different system. The point here is you need to make sure the system and philosophy your coaches implement matches your needs and abilities. There are systems out there that others are pushing and selling that work for most people, and they may work for you, but they may not be the best fit for you. Some examples of systems that people may be pushing are to buy an outside linebacker term life insurance and invest the rest in mutual fund running backs. This person’s system may also include telling you never to buy a variable annuity. Every person’s situation is different, so everyone else’s team may look a little different than yours; the important thing is to find the system and coaches that work for you.”

Whether you love football or you just want to get clear about your financial situation and be prepared to score a touchdown to win the game when it’s time to retire, Football Financial Planning can give you the tools you need now to create the investing system that works for you. Then, when the game is over, you will have a great nest egg to last you for the rest of your life.

 

Why You Should Have Book Tag

So, I’ve seen this book tag going around booktube lately and I thought it would be fun to try it out, being it my first book tag and all.

I’m basically going to say my opinion about a bunch of questions that have the phrase ‘totally should have” in them. Sounds like fun, right?

Let’s do it (!).

*A book that totally should have gotten a sequel*

I’m going with Maybe Someday by Colleen Hoover on this one.

I just didn’t want this book to end. And when it did, I just wanted more. This book was AMAZING. I loved every single word of it, and all I want is more Sydney and Ridge! They are so perfect *sighing dreamily*.

I would have LOVED to get another book with those characters!

All this talk about Maybe Someday makes me want to re-read it for the 6th time.

If you haven’t read this book yet – what have you been doing with your life? READ IT.

*A book series that totally should have had a spin off*

I thought of quite a few options. I mean, who doesn’t want their favourite series to have a spin-off? But it also needs to be fitting. Not every series, as much as you want it to, can have a spin-off.

In any case, I’m going with Harry Potter on this one. It would have been so good to have a spin-off series in the Harry Potter world. Can you imagine a spin-off of all the children of the characters from Harry Potter? Or maybe even a spin-off of Harry’s father, his mother and their friends… how they got to know each other and all of their adventures in their years at Hogwarts.

Oh yes, I totally would’ve wanted to read this.

*An author that totally should have written more books*

Suzanne Collins, Kristine Cashore and J.K Rowling.

All these authors wrote some very good books. The reason I can’t call them favourite authors of mine is because they’ve completely stopped writing more books.

An author grows with each book, gains experience and skills. I believe those authors could have been amazing if they just kept writing more.

Other than having a writer’s block, I honestly don’t get why an author would stop writing. It’s a very sad thing. These authors (and more, like: Stephenie Meyer) totally should have written more books.

*A character that totally should have ended up with somebody else*

99% of the time I ship the ship that will happen. It’s too hard for me to read a book if my ship is destroyed. It’s not to say I haven’t come across books where my ship was doomed.

*If you haven’t read the first 3 books of The Naturals series by Jennifer Lynn Barnes, skip to the next question. I’m going to say exactly who should have ended up with someone else and who did she actually end up with, so… consider yourselves warned*

Cassie should have totally ended up with someone else entirely.

Instead… she ended up with Dean.

*sigh*

Not my ship at all. I was on an entirely different ship called Cassie & Michael.

Cassie and Michael had chemistry and they kept bumping into each other. From the beginning, you just knew there was something special between them.

With Dean? I felt none of that. They hardly talked, hardly had any real conversation or any kind of chemistry and yet somehow they ended up together.

I honestly don’t understand how or why.

Granted, there is at least one more book in the series so it’s not finished quite yet, but… the chances she’ll change her mind for some reason look slim to none right now.

*Another sigh*

But who knows, maybe I’ll get the surprise of my life in the next book and my ship will sail again.

*A book that totally should have ended differently*

Carry on by Rainbow Rowell.

As I wrote in my review of Carry on: This. Is. Not. An. Ending.

The first 90% of the book? Pure amaziness.

The last 10% of the book? All hell breaks loose. Fast. Me? *blinking slowly*, putting the book aside, wondering what in the world just happened.

Seriously? Is this how it ends?

Yeah… no.

*A book that totally should have had a TV show*

Definitely The Lunar Chronicles!

I got this idea the lunar chronicles would make a fantastic TV show while reading the third book. Something about this wold, those characters, all the complexity and awesomeness of it… I could just imagine it as a TV show. And that says a lot considering I’m not in the habit of wanting to turn books I love into movies\TV shows. But with the lunar chronicles… I felt like, in the right hands, it could be such an amazing show.

Can you imagine the possibilities? Just thinking about it makes me all giddy inside.

There is always a risk to adapting a book to the big screen (Just look at the TV show shadowhunters. nope, sorry, I can’t deal with this show. I love the mortal instruments too much), but if done right, wouldn’t it be just amazing?

*A book that totally should have been a movie*

I’m not too keen on book-to-movie adaptations. TV shows? They are usually much more capable of capturing the essence of the book (in those rare occasions) + they are longer and can actually adapt the *whole* book\series and not just parts of it (though they usually don’t do it).

I find that I enjoy the movies of books I didn’t like. Books I love, though… their movies either make me want to kill someone (probably the one who made the movie) or go into denial mode and pretend this movie doesn’t exist. Usually I start with option one and ends up with option two.

So… what book should I nominate for a movie adaptation? I actually have two in mind: Wings by Aprilynn Pike and Sweet Evil by Wendy Higgins. They can turn to be great movies. They both have a very interesting fantasy element that has lots of potential (which I felt hasn’t fully grown in the books).

*A book that totally should have had one POV*

Usually, I don’t have a problem with multiple POVs. If it’s more than 2 POVs than it might get annoying, but I don’t come across many books with more than 2 POVs. The only one that comes to mind is the Heroes Of Olympus series, and while it’s true I didn’t particularly like hearing from a few characters POVs, it didn’t bother me that much.

The Rose & The dagger (by Renee Ahdieh) though… honestly? I did not see the point of condemning us to Irsa POV and a few other random POVs. It was annoying, boring and all I thought while reading those POVs was: “when will we get back to Shazi?” and: “What’s going on with Shazi right now?” and: “Please let this chapter be over so we can go back to the real story.”

Sorry, but you can’t just randomly shove POVs at the readers. Multiple POVs are great when there is a point to them. When there is no apparent point to them? Yeah, not so much.

*A book that totally should have had a cover change*

Richelle Mead has that habit of having ah… really strange book covers for her books. It happened with the vampire academy, with the bloodlines series, and the latest victim was the glittering court book cover. I mean, with the vampire academy and bloodlines I could at least understand there were humans on the covers that were supposed to be Rose and Sydney, but… well, ah… is the person on the glittering court cover even human? It looks *so weird*.

*A book that totally should have not had a cover change*

Hmm… I have to say, I don’t know. It’s usually the other way around: I can’t think of a book I’ve read that got a cover change for the worse. Maybe… Carry On? The previous cover was prettier, in my opinion.

*A book that totally should have stopped at book one*

Divergent.

Oh, believe me, I was a big fan of Divergent once upon a time. I loved books 1 and 2 very much. And then came along book 3 and… well. Let’s just say I would rather it ended with book 1.

“Writing is… being able to take something whole and fiercely alive that exists inside you in some unknowable combination of thought, feeling, physicality, and spirit, and to then store it like a genie is tense, tiny black symbols on a calm white page. If the wrong reader comes across the words, they will remain just words. But for the right readers, your vision blooms off the page and is absorbed into their minds like smoke, where it will re-form, while and alive, fully adapted to its new environment.”
— Mary Gaitskill

Why Historical Fictions Are the Best Books for Young Adults

The ‘best books for young adults’ are historical fiction and here are eleven benefits for you as a young adult, or your parents, to encourage you to read historical fiction.

Statistics show that the young human brain has a natural ability to absorb new information as part of its developmental growth.

As we age the speed at which we learn slows down. While you are young is a good time to encourage the development of the following qualities:

1) KNOWLEDGE – It will have obvious benefits for you as you learn to retain more knowledge and start life with a good grasp of dates and periods of the past.

2) IMAGINATION – As you sense reality in the past, your imagination will grow.

3) APPRECIATION – You will learn an appreciation of the past which will spill into the present

4) RESPECT – You will learn a new respect for the passage of time and will learn to respect the future

5) WISDOM – You will grow wiser as you witness the hypothetical thinking (or not) from the past. Learning from past mistakes will take on a greater meaning for you

6) ENGAGING – You will learn that history is engaging. Characters from the past weave an entertaining illustration around lifeless facts making history a lot more multi-dimensional than a long string of faceless facts designed to make exam time more difficult.

7) MEMORY – As a young adult you will become more proficient at creating instantaneous story ‘cues’ to remember facts later

8) DISCERNMENT – Historical fictions will also teach you to be discerning, when you see how the past can be altered with the flick of the writer’s pen or the command from a king for example

9) RESPECT – You will be taught appreciation for the aging process and respect for older people

10) ROLE MODELING – Helps you to shape your development. The characters from the past are excellent role models for young adults. Their variety of designs and temperaments offer a wide selection for young adults to model themselves after

11) ACCOUNTABILITY – Helps you decide what lifestyle might better yourself or not when you become an adult. Watching the outcome for others can help shape the younger adults accountability for their own actions – NOW!

Check out Amazon.com, Smashwords and any institution carrying historical fiction books and help yourself get a head start in life!

Casey Grace is an expert in the Riviera Maya, Mexico, and books for young adults she has written with her daughter include all aspects of living, working and playing in the ancient land of the Maya.

Her background in the television and film industry in Toronto bring the entertainment aspect to their books.

The Greatest Post Apocalyptic Books

Post-apocalypse is a classic theme of science fiction, where mankind is knocked back into oblivion after something really, really bad happens. Of course, after the dropping of atomic bombs, people for the first time realized that mankind possessed the power to bring about its own apocalypse. However, nuclear holocaust is not the only way catastrophe can strip the thin veneer of civilization of mankind. In the distant, mythical past, the Great Flood almost brought about apocalypse, leaving Noah and his family in a post-apocalyptic scenario. Many such possibilities as to how mankind would respond to overwhelming devastation have been presented to us in science fiction post-apocalyptic books, such as the ones listed below.

1. The Road

An arid world in the aftermath of an unknown severely destructive event is introduced in Cormac McCarthy’s The Road. The dreary landscape now has only a few remaining survivors who are looking for food and warmth. An unnamed father and son are followed in the book as they make their way across the destruction. People in this book’s post-apocalyptic world are turning into savage cannibals and the father is afraid of leaving his son alone because he is certain that he is dying. Nonetheless, the father and son plod on. According to The New York Times, McCarthy’s has always had high standards for despair and yet, the imagery in this book is far more brutal. The Road is probably one of the most gut-wrenching post-apocalyptic books.

2. Dream Caster

Memories of his slaughtered settlement haunt sixteen year old Weaver, who is seeking cover among the remains of a ruined Toronto in a hidden refuge. Amidst build a new life, Weaver discovers he possesses the strangle ability to cast dreams into reality. Weaver ignores it believing it is just an abnormality. He later discovers that his world was actually ruined by a mysterious man who possesses a similar ability of animating nightmares into reality. Chaos starts invading the peaceful life that Weave was hoping to begin. While racing against time, Weaver must learn to accept that he is a dream catcher and master the ability he possesses, before the mysterious man destroys his new home too. The original story idea and unique combination of genres is the best feature of Dream Caster.

3. The Stand

The Stand is perhaps the most popular book by Stephen King and it is also probably one of the most popular post-apocalyptic books too. The worst is imagined in the book, i.e. a superflu’ is unleashed into the world because of a computer error in a Defense Department lab as a result of which 99% of the population is wiped out. Thus, the path for a post-apocalyptic clash between good and evil is paved. While commenting on his own book, King exclaimed that he got the opportunity to scrub the entire human race and that he really enjoyed that.

4. The Drowned World

In his 1962 science-fiction novel, J.G. Ballard tells the story of Robert Kerans, a biologist whose team is sent to survey the cities of American and northern Europe. The regions have been turned into tropical lagoons with the absence of human life as a result of the melting of the polar ice caps and radiation. Kerans and his teammates, among the few survivors, marvel in this new post-apocalyptical state of the world. As written in TIME, the book is cool even though it is kind of too much. The book even has an interesting twist as well and spoiling it would not be fair.

5. The Passage

The Passage is a highly-anticipated book by author Justin Cronin and it hit shelves not so long ago. In fact, even before Cronin even completed the manuscript, he sold the film rights. All the fuss about this 766-page book is that it revolves around bloodthirsty creatures that are somewhat like vampires, but also somewhat like zombies, and these creatures are killing off Americans one by one. However, it is the engrossing sense and style of story that has been hailed by critics.

There is something intriguing about imagining the end of the world. Have you ever imagined the end of the world? These five post-apocalyptic books seem to imagine the end of the world quite uniquely. So which one do you think you will read?

Tips To Get The Point During Reading

Why is that important you might ask, well if your message is clear and to the point your recipient will know exactly what you are talking about. In business clear messages save time and misunderstandings and this is equally important in every-day life. The conversations do not need to be terse of formal just clear and to the point.

Once you have mastered the techniques you will have learned to focus your thinking, speaking and writing. Your conversations won’t wander aimlessly up a blind alley. You will become more logical and easier to listen to, the result a better success rate in your endeavour.

30 seconds is probably the amount of time a person can concentrate, so to catch their attention and get your message across aim to do it in 30 seconds. If you consider adverts on TV they are condensed into bites of around 30 seconds. Why, because it has been found the most successful amount of time for people to absorb the content.

“The little book How to Get your Point across in 30 seconds” by Milo O Frank gives you all the pointers necessary to improve your communication skills. It covers areas like knowing your single objective not complicating matters by having several agendas in one conversation. Talking to the right person, finding the best approach, having a hook to capture attention and using humour. How to develop your subject by painting a picture verbally and of course clearly asking for the result you require.

All through this little book the author has laid out a clear progression for improving your techniques and not being afraid to ask for what you want to achieve. Another book “Ask for the Moon and Get It!” Percy Ross also states in order to succeed, ask for what you want and keep asking.

So in business as in everything else the answer is to know what you want, be specific, clear and concise. This doesn’t mean you can’t be friendly, but be memorable by painting a picture, have a hook to capture attention and finish by asking clearly for your objective. All this should be confined to a 30 second sound bite. Develop this skill and you should find doors open for you and your progress being made.

 

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